WILDLIFE

California’s forests are home to thousands of wildlife species, from insects and algae, to reptiles and rodents, to birds-of-prey, fish and large mammals. Wildlife uses all stages of forest development to meet their food and shelter needs. Forests of every age are important to sustaining the biodiversity of wildlife, and require sound policy and professional management.

  • Young open forests provide ample sunlight for the growth of tree seedlings, grass, berries and shrubs. Young forests provide food for herbivores such as song birds, mice and deer, and make good hunting grounds for predators such as hawks, owls and mountain lions.
    Learn more about animals in this forest here.

  • Middle-aged forests have outgrown weaker trees and shrubs. Thinning has reduced competition and lead to large healthy trees with an open canopy. Middle-aged forests are home to salamanders, garden snakes, raccoons, hawks, deer and black bears.
    Learn more about animals in this forest here.

  • Mature forests contain large trees and dense canopies. Rotting logs and snags provide habitats for insects, chipmunks, woodpeckers and the Northern Spotted Owl.
    Learn more about animals in this forest here.